Believing Is Achieving

“You must do the things you think you cannot do.” Eleanor Roosevelt

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I get a ton of questions daily about what I eat and what kind of exercise I do, so I thought I’d write today and share what I’ve found works for me.  I plan on making this an ongoing series, posting my workouts, meal plans and anything else I find motivational or inspirational.  I know that I love seeing other people post about their meal plans and exercise routines.  I love finding new recipes and ideas.  My idea of spicing up the kitchen is buying chicken with the skin on.  I know, I’m living life on the edge!  Be jealous.

I don’t know about you but I’d much rather think about food than politics or the state of the Union which has been filling up my social media feeds here lately.  All the scrolling to find videos of puppies and kittens and things that make me happy is exhausting lately and quite frankly should be counted as exercise. All that finger swiping has to be burning calories.  I’m going to google that…

Apparently there is an app that calculates how many tweet calories you burn.  An argument could be made that swiping, liking and commenting burns about the same amount of calories as tweeting.  The average, healthy person burns about 2.65 calories per minute.  It takes 23 seconds approximately to craft a 140 character tweet, which means that sending one tweet burns about 1.03 calories.  I don’t do math, so I’m not fact checking this information.  I can’t believe someone sat around trying to figure that out, but it came in handy today.

Anyway, I digress.  One of my major goals for 2017 is to meal plan/prep every week.  So far so good.  I’ve noticed by planning my meals each week, I’ve saved a ton of money and time.  I was literally going to the grocery story every day last year, spending roughly $30-$60 each visit.  More if I was at Target.  We also ate out more often, and I’ve been scaling that back to once a week, maybe twice at most.  Since meal planning/prepping, I’m spending about $150 per week, $600 per month on groceries, approximately.  Some weeks it’s a little higher, some a little lower.  I was spending $210 – $420 per week before.  That’s just ridiculous.  Sunday is my planning day and Monday is my shopping/prepping day.  I put little stars next to the meals that go over really well, and I have theme nights.

For example:

Meatless Mondays

Taco Tuesdays

Whimsical Wednesdays (when I try something new)

Thematic Thursdays (I look for dishes from other cultures/countries – Italian, Spanish, German, Chinese, etc…)

Fallback Fridays (old favorites, comfort foods)

Silly Saturdays (fun foods – like make your own pizza or finger foods only)

I don’t always stick to these themes, but it gives me a guidepost and makes it easier when I’m trying to plan to keep things new and different.  I usually incorporate at least one crockpot meal and I don’t cook on Sundays.

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I do not diet.  However, I do believe that what we do in the kitchen, dictates how successful we will be in creating healthier, fitter, happier versions of ourselves.  I follow the 80/20 rule.  80% of the time I follow a healthy, clean and wholesome food plan.  The 20% rule is because I love Chick Fil A, Girl Scout Cookies, Chocolate and wine and I don’t believe in deprivation.  I spent years abusing my body.  Starving.  Overeating.  Binge eating.  The word “die” is in diet for a reason.  It was literally killing me.  I’ve tried every diet out there and none of it worked long-term.  I worked with a nutritionist and therapist prior to my surgery and there is a reason they require it.  My relationship with food was detrimental to my mental, physical and emotional well-being.  I had to change the way I felt and thought about food or I would end up being another statistic.  I felt like surgery was a pretty drastic action, it wasn’t something I entered into lightly, and I didn’t want to put myself thru all of the this only to end up back where I started someday.

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I learned that food is neither inherently good nor inherently bad.  We assign values to food and it creates this unhealthy relationship.  We eat something “bad” and we beat ourselves up, feeling crappy and worthless and in my case, I’d end up just eating more “bad” food in this vicious cycle of self-loathing.  We embark on these crazy diets and fads, billions of dollars are spent every year, making the fitness/health industry one of the largest, yet we are still obese as a country on the whole and that number is rising every day.  There isn’t a magic formula or magic pill to lose weight or get fit.  If there was I definitely would have found it by now.  Losing weight also doesn’t mean losing fat.  The scale lies.  I threw out my scale and it was the best decision I ever made.

THROW OUT THE SCALE!

 You will be happier I promise.  Take your measurements, pay attention to how you feel, how your clothes feel and celebrate non-scale victories.  The scale will only make you miserable and obsessed, it is not an accurate measure of your success, failure or progress.  It doesn’t tell the whole story.  In fact, the scale tells “alternative facts”.  Cheeky I know, I went there.  Deal with it ❤

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How much do I eat?

Here is the other mistake many people (especially women) make when it comes to food and eating.  We don’t eat enough.  I KNOW!  Shocking, but true.  We are starving ourselves.  Our bodies need fuel, especially if you are working out.  I use the formula below to determine how many calories I should be consuming each day and I use the MyFitnessPal app (iPhone) to track my food.  I’m not super religious about tracking, mostly I use it to ensure I’m getting my protein each day.  I aim to get about 60+ grams of protein each day.  Then I balance out the rest of my diet with fruits/vegetables, whole grains, fats, etc.

What is your gender? Your Score: 1 or less – 1,200 – 1,499 calories
Female +1 2 – 1,500 – 1,799 calories
Male +2 3 – 1,800 – 2,099 calories
4 – 2,100 – 2,399 calories
What is your weight? 5 – 2,400 – 2,699 calories
130 lbs or less +1 6 – 2,700 – 2,999 calories
131-160 lbs +2 7 – 3,000 – 3,299 calories
161-180 lbs +3 8 or more – 3,300 – 3,599 calories
181 – 200 lbs +4
201 – 220 lbs +5
221 lbs + +6
What is your current activity level?
Inactive (desk job) -1
Moderate (server in a restaurant) 0
Very Active (construction worker) +1
What is your goal?
Lean out -2
Maintain Weight 0
Build Muscle +1
Total Score

You are wondering how I know how much I weigh if I threw out my scale.  Well, I still have to go to the doctor and they make me stand on it.  You’ll have some idea of how much you weigh, even if you don’t have a scale.

Make sure you are eating enough!

Exercise – I work out 4-6 days per week, depending on what is going on that week.  Never fewer than 4 days and never on Sunday.  What I do each day depends on my mood and how I feel.  Typically, I walk 4-5 days per week, 1-3 miles.  Currently, I am doing the T25 program thru Beachbody, which are 25 minutes in length and vary each day in terms of what is focused on (i.e. lower body, total body, cardio).  I also work to hit at least 10,000 steps per day.

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I don’t love exercise, and I won’t pretend that I do.  I do it because I do love how it is changing my body and how strong it makes me feel.  I do it because I don’t want to gain the weight back, and I still have inches I want to lose.  I do it because I know how bad not doing it makes me feel.  I can’t and won’t go back there.  I wish there was another way, an easier way.  But there is not.  You have to move your body and fuel it with wholesome and nutritious foods.  It takes so much longer to take it off than it does to put it on, which is horribly unfair.  Alas, it’s the way it is and that won’t change.  Find what motivates and inspires you.  Make exercise a daily task or to-do on your list, schedule it on your calendar. Whatever you need to do to make working out and YOU a priority.  You deserve it.  You need it.  You’ll be a better person for it.

I promise.

I’m here for you.  We can do this together.  We’ve totally got this!

Next time, I’ll share meal prep ideas, meal plans and recipes.  Let me know if there is anything I can do to help you, inspire you, motivate you.

Wickedly Fit – A Halloween Challenge

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“Take care of your body.  It’s the only place you have to live.” Jim Rohn

On Halloween, I completed day 21 of a fitness challenge I joined called “Wickedly Fit.”  I’m all about the packaging, and the title of this fitness challenge group was just too cute to pass up!

My health and fitness goals have been stagnate for awhile now.  I hadn’t gained any weight, but I hadn’t lost any either.  I could see the old patterns of behavior, poor eating choices and a sedentary lifestyle sneaking back into my daily life.

It scared me.

But not enough to take action.  Yet.

I’d been creeping on this one girl’s Instagram account.   I didn’t know her.  I’m not even sure how I ended up following her to be honest.  I loved reading her posts and seeing her photos.  She’s adorable, motivational and inspirational.  I wanted to be a part of whatever she was doing.  It took me 4 months to get up the courage to message her.  Our stories are vastly different, but one thing I’ve learned is that unhealthy means different things to different people and it isn’t always just a reflection of the number on the scale.  In fact, I don’t even have a goal weight anymore and I’m seriously considering throwing out my scale altogether, especially after seeing the results of this latest fitness challenge.

I finally found the courage to message her.  She immediately responded.  Her excitement and enthusiasm were contagious.  Before I even knew what happened, I was signing up for her fitness challenge. For the first time in months, I was thrilled about the prospect of working out and overhauling our pantry and fridge.  I know.  It was crazy.  I didn’t even recognize myself.

I’m not one to get excited about healthy eating or exercise.  Ever.  The only thing working out has ever made me want to do is nap.  I get endorphins for chocolate or Chick Fil A but not from exercise.  It had been just over a year since my Gastric Sleeve surgery.  The surgery had taken me as far as it could, the rest was going to be up to me.

I knew this.

I just didn’t want to know I knew this.

My highest weight recorded was 297 pounds.  I’ve never told anyone that number.  It took me 6 months to lose 10 pounds and that’s when I decided to look into Gastric Sleeve surgery.  When I decided to go in for surgery, I was down to 287.5 pounds.  The date was July 21, 2015.  My surgery date was August 19, 2015.  By January 2016, I was down to 216 pounds.  I lost 71.5 pounds in 6 months.  Unfortunately, there were side effects.  My hair thinned out, at an alarming rate.  I lost muscle and I found myself feeling low on energy and motivation.  My periods, while much improved, were still bad and irregular.  I lost another 10 pounds over the next few months, but by May of 2016, I had stalled out.  I didn’t exercise over the summer and I was starting to panic that I was going to eventually put all the weight back on.  Gastric sleeve surgery gave me an internal control over portion size, but I was filling up on all the wrong things and wasn’t getting the vitamins and nutrients my body needed.  I felt run down and worn out.  Not to mention, disgusted with myself.  Did I really put myself through all this only to quit, to fail?

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Was I going to be THAT girl again?

I hope not.

No, I definitely did not want to fail (nor did I want to see my chins having chins)!

So I gathered my courage and messaged this girl to find out what this Wickedly Fit program was all about.

I received access to a Facebook accountability group (my favorite part).  This group of women kept me going day after day.  They were positive and encouraging.  They were open and honest about their struggles and challenges.  We celebrated non-scale victories, participated in daily challenge questions/activities and posted all sorts of wonderful food porn (the clean and healthy kind).  I wasn’t intimidated by this group at all.  Quite the opposite in fact. I found myself sharing and opening up about my own struggles and daily challenges and even victories.  I found myself bolstered and encouraged and being a part of this special group of ladies gave me the motivation I needed to complete this 21 day challenge.

I also received a 30 day supply of Shakeology and the 21 Day Fix workout program and eating plan, complete with portion control containers.  This whole program is facilitated by Beachbody.  I was familiar with their programs, and had used them to bounce back in shape after my youngest daughter was born.  I knew they worked.  I knew it wasn’t a quick fix.  I knew it would take hard work and dedication on my part.

I was ready.

Sort of.

I mean, I paid for it.  So I’d better be ready.  I was nervous though…

Failure.  My biggest fear.  Always hovering over me like the Grim Reaper.  Whispering negative words of discouragement in my ear, making me doubt myself.  This particular demon has always plagued me, but I was learning to fight back.  I was learning to stifle and smother those negative thoughts and feelings.  I have good days and bad days.  Days when I see all that I have accomplished and days when I only see the ways in which I have failed. Before my surgery, I would binge eat those feelings.  Now, I binge watch Netflix.  Not quite the trade I should be making.  I know.  But still…a slight improvement.

The “before” picture was taken on Day 1 of the challenge and the “after” picture taken on the last day of the challenge.  21 days total.  I lost 3 1/2 inches overall.  I can definitely see subtle changes and I hope you see them too.  Naturally, I lost the most inches in my chest. Just proving that my boobs are the first thing to go when I lose weight.  Actually, despite losing 3 1/2 inches, I gained 3 pounds.  I weighed before I measured and I was devastated.  I almost didn’t even take my measurements, but I’m so glad I did.  I’ve never been one to record my measurements, but this 21 day challenge made a believer out of me.  I could see noticeable differences in how my clothes fit and how I felt that just wasn’t reflected on the scale.

It was a dark moment, and one that in the past I would have responded to by raiding the pantry.  Instead, I chose to reach out to my challenge group through Facebook.  Post my results and reveal what I considered to be a failure, the gaining of 3 pounds.  I’ve since adjusted my perceptions and I’m super proud of the 3 1/2 inches I lost.  I can’t wait for my next challenge group to start!  Despite what my scale would have me believe, I am transforming my body, making positive changes, gaining strength and confidence.

I’ve got this!

Today.

Tomorrow might be a different story.  But I’ll deal with tomorrow…tomorrow.

The last year of my life was about losing the weight and finding myself.  This next year, I want to focus on living a healthy lifestyle, strengthening my body, mind and soul in new and different ways.  Yes, I still have weight I want to lose, but I want to focus less on the scale and more on building strength and flexibility, pushing my body in ways I never imagined I’d be able to do again.  I want to transform myself physically, mentally and spiritually.  I want to develop attainable goals and then smash through them.  I want to redefine what beauty and success mean to me, not measured by what others think or believe, but about what works for me.

One day at a time.

I want to share my journey and experiences with others.  I draw strength from putting myself out there, as terrifying as it can be.  I hope that maybe someone reading this will be inspired or encouraged, reach out either to me or someone else.  I hope that maybe they won’t feel alone or afraid.  Our goals might be different.  Our struggles, challenges and motivations might be different.  At the end of the day, we all want to be the best versions of ourselves.  We all have desires, wants and needs.  Things we want to accomplish.  Let’s do it together ❤

Highway to Health

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“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face… You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” Eleanor Roosevelt

My biggest fear is fear of failure.

My weight was never about the number on the scale or what size clothes I wore or trying to conform to a cultural ideal.  My weight was an outward representation of how I felt on the inside.

My weight became my excuse.

My excuse to withdraw from life, to hide.

The worse I felt about myself, my circumstances, the more weight I put on, which made me feel even worse, creating this pattern of cyclical despair.  I felt sorry for myself and every pound represented that self-pity.  I wasn’t just physically unhealthy, I was emotionally unhealthy.  I felt abandoned in my self-imposed exile.

My weight was a way to keep everyone at a distance.  I felt shame.

Shame that I allowed myself to spin so far out of control.  The more shame I felt, the higher the walls I built around myself.  Every pound was a virtual brick, shame the mortar holding it all together, higher and higher the wall grew almost with a life of its own.  I felt trapped by my own inadequacy to make impactful change.  I felt paralyzed by fear.

Fear of failure.

Every diet or exercise program I attempted ended with me gaining more weight.  The weight gain or failure to lose pounds fueled my negative internal dialogue.  It was simply a matter of self-control, of which I clearly had none.  Why keep trying?  I can’t do it. I’ve tried.  I’m tired of failing. The biggest lie of all that I told myself, “I can learn to be happy at this weight”.  Why should I try to live up to some unrealistic societal expectation?  Look at so and so, she’s fat but rich, famous and seemingly happy.  I don’t care what I look like or how much I weigh.  It doesn’t matter.  It’s just a number on a scale.  Why am I putting so much emphasis and importance on it.  Let it go.

My walls appeared to be constructed out of indifference and self-deprecation but truly they were born out of depression, fear and loneliness.  I lost my faith, my way…myself.

I was a spectator of my own life, not an active participant.

I can’t pinpoint exactly when I flipped the script.  I know the decision to have Gastric Sleeve surgery was the beginning.

Every pound lost is a huge victory for me, emotionally and physically.  I haven’t gained any weight since my surgery, but I certainly have had weeks when I didn’t lose any.  I feel disappointment, but instead of letting that spiral into feelings of failure and seeking comfort in the pantry or fridge, I’ve learned to accept, adapt and let go.

However, whoever said nothing tastes as good as being thin feels must never have tried the Honey Butter Chicken Biscuit from Whataburger. I have a love/hate relationship with food.  I’ll never strictly view food as a source of nutrition or fuel, for me it’s also about comfort and solace.  I eat when bored, upset and/or angry.  Food and I are frenemies.  At times it’s my best friend, other times my mortal enemy.  Food and I will never have a normal relationship, my success is dependent on recognizing this fact and learning alternative methods to deal with my emotions, both positive and negative.  I have good days and bad days.  Days where I struggle and find myself standing in the pantry waging this internal war.  Some days I win.  Other days I lose.  Every day is a new day.  I don’t beat myself up anymore, instead I’ve learned to celebrate every victory, no matter how small.

I have learned to appreciate views like these on my hikes –

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I’m an active participant in my life again, and it feels glorious.  I celebrate getting to experience days like these with my children –

We laughed so hard, I nearly peed myself.  Actually, I might have a little…

LIFE IS GOOD!

I started this journey at 287.5 pounds.  My BMI was 49.34.

Last month, I checked in at 220.2 pounds.

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Today, I weighed in at 213.4 pounds. My current BMI is 36.6.

Over the last month, I’ve lost 6.8 pounds.

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I can’t really see the 6.8 pounds lost in these photos, but I can feel it, in how my clothes fit and in how I feel.  Every pound I lose gives me more energy and more encouragement.  I’m still kicking myself that I didn’t take pics before my surgery.  Oh well.  I may not remember what I looked like, but I’ll never forget how I felt and I never want to feel that way again.  Plus, I’ve kept my size 26 pants.  I put them on occasionally, and I can still remember those days when they felt tight.  I smile at how far I’ve come.

Total pounds lost:  74.1

My BMI dropped 12.74.  I’ve added years to my life, both in quantity and quality.

I learn something new about myself every day.  I am constantly looking for new ways to challenge myself.  I’ve come such a long way and it feels great to say that I’m super proud of myself.  My journey is far from over and I’d be lying if I said I can’t wait to hit “ONEderland.”  I don’t remember the last time I weighed in the 100’s.  I’ll have another update for you in a month!

“The most authentic thing about us is our capacity to create, to overcome, to endure, to transform, to love and to be greater than our suffering.” Ben Okri

Weighing In

When last I left you, I told you about my decision to have Gastric Sleeve surgery.  My insurance company required a certain number of meetings between myself, a nutritionist and a therapist.  It took over 3 months from the time I decided to have the surgery and the date the actual surgery took place.

I met my surgeon, Dr. Russ Birdwell.  He put me immediately at ease, not too mention he was easy on the eyes and he enjoys Hockey, Football and working on his aquarium.  Or so I heard.  From a friend. Named Google.  It’s not stalking if you can google it.  I read that somewhere.

My starting weight was 287.5 pounds.  It doesn’t get any easier sharing that number.  On surgery day, I weighed 266.2 pounds.  I’ll be honest the majority of that weight was lost during the 14 day fast prior to surgery.  The weeks preceding the fast, I didn’t gain any weight, but I didn’t really lose any weight either.  I’ve mentioned before that I’m an emotional eater.  I eat when I’m bored, sad, happy or angry.  So, pretty much all the time unless I’m asleep.  I don’t remember the last time I ate because I was actually hungry.  It was important to make myself aware of these behaviors, work on my portion control and make better food choices in general.  I worked on eating more slowly and chewing my food thoroughly.    Practicing these habits now, would help during my recovery period.

I wasn’t worried about the fast once I learned the reason it was necessary.  During surgery, they have to move the liver to access the stomach.  It lowers complications if your liver is small and malleable.  Complications are bad.  I didn’t want complications.  My liver would have won Best Liver in a Laparoscopic Surgery award.  My doctor would have wanted to date me if I was single, that’s how slinky and attractive my liver looked.  Things just got weird.  Moving on…

During the fast, you can have 3 shakes per day.  They give you a list of acceptable protein shakes, and I picked EAS carb control in chocolate.  You could also have sugar-free clear liquids and broths.  I lived off jello, popsicles and protein shakes.  Also water.  Lots and lots of water.  I hate water.  Surprisingly, it didn’t suck, cause you know…liver.  Although, I can’t look at jello now without throwing up in my mouth a little.

I didn’t exercise during this time.  Honestly, existing on less than 500 calories a day, walking to the fridge felt like marathon training.  My iron levels were low, so he had me taking Iron Supplements as well as a daily multi-vitamin.  They take vials and vials of blood and run a battery of tests to ensure everything goes as smoothly as possible during surgery.

Surgery day has finally arrived! I’ve lost 21.3 pounds and I’m both excited and nervous for this next chapter of my life to begin.  Hopefully, a thinner and healthier chapter.  I make sure to talk to each of my kids, just in case…  I don’t want to have these morbid thoughts, but one of the complications is death.  I wanted to make sure that if I was going to have last words, they were “I love you.”  Also, that Jerry knew I wanted to be cremated.  We don’t agree on this issue, so I was adamant he promise to cremate me, not bury me.  If he didn’t, I would haunt him for the rest of his life in a scary Poltergeist kinda way, not in a comedic Ghostbuster kinda way or sweet Casper kinda way.  Also, if he wanted, he could turn my ashes into a diamond and wear me.  What?  That’s a thing.

The surgery was successful, zero complications.  Yay me!  Yay my sexy liver for being all cooperative!

Then I came out of anesthesia.  My first thought was that something went terribly wrong.  The pain.  I’m having a heart attack.  Something isn’t right.  All I can do is cry.  There is a nurse.  She’s mean to me, tells me they just gave me morphine.  It’s not working.  I’m convinced I’m dying, I start to hyperventilate.  I start throwing up.  Or dry heaving really.  It’s horrible.

I wake up again in my room.  There is my husband and a nice nurse.  She tells me the pain I’m feeling is gas from all the air they pumped into my stomach and that the best relief would be to walk around.

Walk around?!?!  But I’m dying.  I know it.  No one ever in the history of the world has experienced pain like this.  Why is my husband just standing there!  He should be yelling at the nurses to DO something!

I’d whine and complain more but I’m too busy throwing up.  Again.  They keep insisting walking will help.  So I walk.  Throw up.  Walk some more.  The pain might be lessening.  Less of an elephant sitting on my chest, more of a hippo maybe.  Do hippos weigh less than elephants?  I think so.  Maybe the walking is helping.

I’m feeling slightly better.  I might have been a tad dramatic before.  Ignore me.  I’m not a good patient.  I have a very low pain tolerance.  Those poor nurses.  I’m afraid to look at my stomach, I don’t want to see the incisions.  I can’t stop throwing up, which although painful and unpleasant, does help alleviate the gas pains.

I’m kept overnight, to ensure there are no complications.  Apparently, pain, gas and vomiting aren’t complications, but side effects… Before I’m allowed to go home, I have to have a scan done to make sure everything looks good.  I have to drink this dye, which I can’t keep down.  I keep throwing it back up.  Somehow, I manage to keep enough down to do the scan.  I’ve lost all dignity at this point.  I just want to go home.  I’m a terrible patient.  They probably want me to go home too. The only thing I’ll miss are the leg massager things you get to wear to keep blood clots from forming.  Those things were awesome.

I’m finally able to keep down water.  I take teensy tiny sips.  I pretty much exist on water for the 1st 4 days or so.  Every week I’m allowed to add foods to my diet, starting with clear liquids and slowly adding solids.  They recommend you do it slowly so you know exactly what foods you tolerate and which ones you don’t.  Once I got home, the vomiting finally stopped and hasn’t been an issue since.  I’m careful to eat slow and stop when I’m full.  Jerry still asks me “is that all you’re going to eat?”  Sigh.

Two weeks post-op, I see Dr. Birdwell for my follow up.  My incisions are healing nicely.  I weigh 254.3.  I’ve lost another 11.9 pounds.  A total of 33.2 pounds lost.

As soon as I’m released to exercise, I begin walking and I join a boot camp, Camp Gladiator.  I hate exercise.  I’m never going to love it.  It will always be a struggle and I have to make myself go.  I’ve accepted this and it’s ok.  I like how exercise makes me feel.  I love getting stronger.  I love the endurance I’m building.  I’m much more active with my kids.  These are the benefits and what keeps me motivated.  It’s enough, for now.

My current weight is 220.2.  A total of 67.3 pounds lost since July 21, 2015.  The pic on the left is today, the one on the right is my DL photo from 2014 and the closest to my max weight that I could find.  Next time I do a gnarly close-up, I’ll have to wear makeup. I apologize.  First all the liver and vomit talk and now these pics…  I hope you aren’t eating.

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Here is a current picture in my workout clothes.  I’ll start tracking monthly from this point until I reach my goal weight with photos in addition to my weekly weigh-ins.  I wish I had the same photo taken here at my max weight, but as I’ve mentioned, I did everything possible to avoid cameras or mirrors.

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My goal is to reach 145 pounds (height is 5 ft 4 in).  I’m halfway there.  I know it’s going to get harder from here on out, and I’m hoping that posting monthly updates on my blog will help keep my momentum and accountability.  I’m still losing anywhere from 1-3 pounds per week.  I’ve been slacking in the exercise department with the busy Christmas rush, only walking 1-3 times per week.  Camp Gladiator starts back up in January, so I plan to hit the New Year running…or rather huffing and puffing.

I couldn’t post every detail of my surgery or recovery here, or this blog would be like 3,000 words and who has time for that!  If you are considering the surgery, or have questions for me, please feel free to ask.

Thank you for the encouraging words, you have no idea how much it helps keep me motivated on this journey ❤

Till next time…

Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays everyone!

xoxo